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Tibet striving to build eco-safety shelter


19 May, 2010

Readers Note: Readers Note: Please a take cynical view of the article below as it only shows part of this disturbing picture. As China creates wildlife zones and nature parks throughout Tibet it is simultaneously doing great harm to the Tibetan Nomads and their families. This nature designation plan is a ruse for the forcible displacement of the Tibet people from their historic lands and livelihood. The raising and the grazing of yaks, sheep and goats for their wool and other byproducts has been a tradition for well over a thousand years. This has been done without harm to the environment and the wild life that live on it. What other reason is there for this obsequious development than to hold the land for their own destructive mining and to control the movement of the Tibetan People. Nomads. : Editor

Costing a total of 15.5 billion yuan (2.27 billion U.S. dollars), the project is considered conducive to improving China's regional environment and to tackling the global climatic change as well
Costing a total of 15.5 billion yuan (2.27 billion U.S. dollars), the project is considered conducive to improving China's regional environment and to tackling the global climatic change as well. (Xinhua Photo)

The project to build Tibet's ecological safety shelter has been well under way, involving three categories and ten sub-projects for eco-environment protection, according to the People's Daily.

Costing a total of 15.5 billion yuan (2.27 billion U.S. dollars), the project is considered conducive to improving China's regional environment and to tackling the global climatic change as well.

With its landmass accounting for one eighth of the country's total, Tibet has the world's third largest glacier reserve, next only to the North and South poles.

Tibet is also the home to the national major rivers, lakes, swamps and wetlands, and ranks first in China in terms of the total amount of water resources and forestry coverage.

To date, Tibet has established 47 nature reserves, covering 410,000 sq km, or 35 percent of its landmass, with 24 at the prefectural level, 14 at the regional level and nine at the national level.

In the region with China's largest nature reserves, 125 species of wild animals and 39 species of wild plants have been given national priority protection.

Meanwhile, some species previously considered extinct have been found in the regional nature natures, such as Tibetan red deer.

Thanks to effective preservation, the number of wildlife has been increasingly larger in recent years. For example, the population of Tibetan antelopes, or Chiru, has risen to 150,000 at present.




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