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China Resume Repairs on Dalai Lama's Summer Palace in Lhasa

[WTN-L World Tibet Network News. Published by The Canada Tibet Committee. Issue ID: 2006/03/21; March 21, 2006.]

Beijing, March 21 (PTI) - China has resumed repair of Norbu Linkag, the summer palace of the Dalai Lamas, after a break of over four months due to winter, a report from the remote Himalayan region said today.

Norbu Lingka is one of the three cultural relic sites listed f or large-scale repairs that began in June 2002, with funds of about 40.69 million U.S. Dollars from the state coffers.

The other two sites are Potala Palace, the 1,300-year-old winter palace of the Dalai Lama, and Sakya Monastery, where numerous rare religious relics are kept. Work on these two buildings has not yet resumed.

Chief of the administration for Norbu Lingka, Ma Yigang said the main tasks to be completed this year would be mostly public facilities such as the drainage system, fire control and security works, Xinhua news agency reported.

Situated in the western suburbs of Lhasa, Norbu Lingka was built in the middle of the 18th century and served as the summer palace of the Dalai Lamas. It was the place where they handled political affairs, practiced religious activities and spent their holidays.

Both the Potala Palace and Norbu Lingka have been i nscribed on the World Heritage List of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation.

The repairs on the three cultural relic sites are expected to be finished this year. The 14th Dalai Lama, Tibet's highest spiritual leader, who escaped to India after a failed uprising against Chinese rule in Tibet in 1959, lives in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh.


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